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GERM-545 Literacy and FL Teaching
Fall for 2014-2015
This graduate-level seminar focuses on developing requisite foundational knowledge and critical awareness of various practical approaches to foreign language instruction in the American educational context, particularly at the college level (e.g., communicative, task-based, ecological-semiotic, etc.). Students become informed about (1) cognitive, socio-cultural, linguistic, and affective factors influencing the principles and processes of learning, particularly instructed second language learning; (2) the historical, educational, institutional, and curricular context within which instruction takes place; (3) pedagogical approaches to developing adult learners’ second language ability; and (4) the roles they could and should take on as teachers in order to enhance student learning.

Special emphasis in the course is on the integration of language and content instruction in a college environment that lies at the heart of the curricular reform called for by the FL professionals today (e.g., MLA 2007 report). Students explore ways of transcending the language/content divide and developing curricula and courses where it becomes possible to address various thematic areas and at the same time explicitly attend to advanced language development. To that end, students analyze discourses of textual and media genres (e.g., personal and public narratives, appeal, speech, exposition, recipe, catastrophe film, political poster, etc.), and genre-based tasks as materials that facilitate adult second language acquisition.

All of the activities in the course recognize various backgrounds in SLA theory and teaching practice and draw on them to socialize students into becoming self-directed and reflective teachers, a life-long process.

(Qualified undergraduate students interested in teaching foreign languages may be allowed to enroll.)
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
Look for this course in the schedule of classes.

The academic department web site for this program may provide other details about this course.

Georgetown University37th and O Streets, N.W., Washington D.C. 20057(202) 687.0100

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