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GOVT-486 Islam and International Politics
Peter Henne
This course is designed as an introduction to the role Islam—and religion in general—plays in international politics. It is intended to expose students to a variety of perspectives on this issue, including both general overviews of Islam and politics and studies of specific countries. While the course is focused on Islam, a proper background in the study of religion and politics is required, so the course will spend some time on this subject. The course is divided into three units. The first unit focuses on religion and international politics, covering topics such as the role of ideas in international politics, a general discussion of how religion affects politics and the international system, and how to conceptualize inter-religious interactions. The second unit focuses on Islam, beginning with a general discussion on how to approach the topic of Islam and politics and moving to more specific issues, including the relationship between Islam and violence, foreign policy and peace-building. Each topic includes a discussion of the relationship between the issue and religion in general before moving to a discussion of Islam in particular. In this way, the study of Islam and International Politics can be tied to broader debates in the field and compared with the study of other religions. The course concludes with the third unit, which is a debate on the role of religion in a particular case, the civil war in Algeria; this unit is intended to bring together the various subjects addressed in the course in one discussion. The course will be a mix of lecture and discussion.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: 117 or permission of instructor

Sections:

GOVT-486-01 Columbia: Examining Conflict
Spring for 2015-2016
Faculty:
  • Chernick, Marc
  • Please contact instructor
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: None
    GOVT-486-20 Islam and International Politics
    Peter Henne
    This course is designed as an introduction to the role Islam—and religion in general—plays in international politics. It is intended to expose students to a variety of perspectives on this issue, including both general overviews of Islam and politics and studies of specific countries. While the course is focused on Islam, a proper background in the study of religion and politics is required, so the course will spend some time on this subject. The course is divided into three units. The first unit focuses on religion and international politics, covering topics such as the role of ideas in international politics, a general discussion of how religion affects politics and the international system, and how to conceptualize inter-religious interactions. The second unit focuses on Islam, beginning with a general discussion on how to approach the topic of Islam and politics and moving to more specific issues, including the relationship between Islam and violence, foreign policy and peace-building. Each topic includes a discussion of the relationship between the issue and religion in general before moving to a discussion of Islam in particular. In this way, the study of Islam and International Politics can be tied to broader debates in the field and compared with the study of other religions. The course concludes with the third unit, which is a debate on the role of religion in a particular case, the civil war in Algeria; this unit is intended to bring together the various subjects addressed in the course in one discussion. The course will be a mix of lecture and discussion.
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: 117 or permission of instructor
    GOVT-486-62 Machiavelli in Florence
    Fall for 2015-2016
    Spring for 2015-2016
    This Department of Government Seminar begins in early summer on the GU Washington, DC, campus and concludes at the Villa Le Balze in Fiesole (Florence), Italy.

    Following Machiavelli’s concept of a “discussion with the ancients” with relevance to modern issues, this 3 credit seminar encompasses three elements:
    • In-depth study of Machiavelli’s writings and an appreciation of the Florentine environment in which he wrote them;
    • Actively apply Machiavellian teachings in “balance of power” laboratory by students participating as strategists in a European focused historical Cold War “Nth Power” simulation and the Asian centered future oriented “Hegemon” simulation.
    • Incorporating the insights of Machiavelli to a Research Paper on modern security challenges in Asia today.

    Interested students should contact the Office of International Programs.
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: None
    More information
    Look for this course in the schedule of classes.

    The academic department web site for this program may provide other details about this course.

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