Skip to main content

GOVT-505 Topics
Spring for 2014-2015
See below
Please refer to individual sections for course descriptions.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

GOVT-505-01 Topics: Advocacy Skills
Spring for 2014-2015
Anderlini, Sanam
Designed to be interactive and practice oriented, the course will inform students of the key concepts and elements of effective advocacy - with attention to theories of change principles, articularing advocacy goals, target audiences, coaliton building and networking, messaging, presentations and funding raising. I will share examples of international and national level efforts, and provide an opportunity for students to explore and develop their own ideas and designs.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
GOVT-505-02 Topics: Building a Sustainable Nonprofit Organization
Spring for 2014-2015
Chisholm, Cameron
The course aims to expose students to the major ideas, trends, processes, and unique qualities animating successful non-profit organizations. Students will experience developing the analytical and relational skills at the foundation of being an effective leader and thinking strategically about applying the toolbox of management approaches to building a contemporary sustainable non-profit organization. These skills include, but are not limited to, leadership, social entrepreneurship, mission development, business planning, project planning/design, budgeting, board development and management, branding/marketing/technology utilization, networking, presentation skills, and launch plans.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
GOVT-505-03 Topics: Writing for Govt Grants & Contracts in Intl Development
Spring for 2014-2015
Bjornlund, Eric
This course is intended to help students to understand the process of government funding for international development programs and to help prepare them to write proposals and applications for government contracts and grants in international development and related fields. It is designed to encourage the development of practical skills that will be directly relevant and useful in writing proposals and applications. Students who take this course should be more marketable and better prepared to work at consulting firms/government contractors, NGOs, government agencies, intergovernmental organizations or other places involved in international development or other government-funded fields.

The course will meet once a week for five weeks beginning in late January. We will begin with an overview of government contracting (acquisition) and grants (assistance), including consideration of the policy, legal and regulatory environment governing U.S. government funding, with a particular focus on the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Department of State. Next, we will consider the scopes of work or program descriptions of actual USG requests for proposals (RFPs) or requests for applications (RFAs). Then, we will focus on the instructions and evaluation criteria from particular RFPs, which govern the process of responding to such RFPs, and we will compare the corresponding requirements from particular RFAs, all drawn from actual solicitations in the international development field. We will also touch on other mechanisms, such as Annual Program Statements, Broad Agency Announcements, Requests for Information and Requests for Statements of Interest, among others. Throughout the course, we will work on practical writing issues that are particularly relevant to proposals and applications for U.S. government funding.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
GOVT-505-04 Topics: Technology for Social Change
Spring for 2014-2015
Martin, Nick
New technologies have fundamentally changed the way that NGOs, governments and companies engage with communities around the world. Tools like mobile phones, digital maps, and social media platforms have already demonstrated tremendous value in addressing a range of social problems and yet so much more potential exists on the horizon. This one credit course will explore some of the ways technology is being used to respond to crises, improve healthcare delivery, monitor elections, provide banking services, ensure effective governance, expand educational opportunities, and more. It will also address some of the key challenges these new tools present, such as lack of access, underdeveloped infrastructure, implementation issues, as well as obstacles for scale-up and evaluation. The course is designed for Georgetown University students to assist them in developing concrete strategies and technological skills to work amid this rapidly evolving landscape. Participants can expect an immersive and interactive learning environment with a variety of real world examples from organizations working in the field.

Featured Skills and Tools
- Using Mobile phones to improve agricultural, finance, and health outcomes
- Leveraging social media tools to build campaigns and drive change
- Collecting, managing, and visualizing data more effectively
Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
GOVT-505-05 Topics: Storytelling for Influence
Spring for 2014-2015
Lentfer, Jennifer
As institutions and organizations evolve, everyone has a role and responsibility in ensuring that their messages break through the information superhighway to enable the changes they want to see in the world. Communications is no longer a specialized skill set to increase visibility and build a brand, it is something all people in an organization must use to achieve its mission. Storytelling for Influence will enable students to hone their ability to educate, motivate, and persuade specialized audiences for policy advocacy, programming, and public outreach, i.e. write something that will get read and say something that will be heard. The course will be based in experiential learning, where students will be telling/writing their own stories and/or critiquing/improving existing communications products using acquired knowledge/tools.
Credits: 1
Prerequisites: None
More information
Look for this course in the schedule of classes.

The academic department web site for this program may provide other details about this course.

Georgetown University37th and O Streets, N.W., Washington D.C. 20057(202) 687.0100

Connect with us via: