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GOVT-592 Conflict Resolution and Development
Fall for 2014-2015
Faculty:
  • Orellana, Seniha
  • It is becoming increasingly evident that violent conflict and underdevelopment mutually reinforces each other. For instance, although there is no direct causal relation between conflict and poverty, poor countries are more at risk of conflict. At the same time violent conflict, its threat, and the build-up of arms in many countries have enormous long-term social, political, and economic costs. Conflicts cause significant damage to physical infrastructure, unemployment, lack of rule of law, and collapse of key social institutions. In order to establish sustainable peace, impact of conflicts in terms of human suffering, economic and social dislocation and wasted developmental opportunities must be addressed and this viscous cycle must be broken. This course focuses on the uncanny relationship between conflict, development and peace building. It takes a multidisciplinary approach, which is essential for grasping the complexity of the development process and introduces a range of concepts, theories and approaches raised in this field. The course also explores various concerns and challenges faced by practitioners working in the fields of peace building and development, as well as policy responses that seek solutions to these concerns and challenges. This course also highlights the importance of protecting and managing natural resources, mobilizing domestic resources, coordinating external assistance, fostering good corporate citizenship, and providing adequate and appropriate infrastructure and services within the context of development and peace building.
    Credits: 3
    Prerequisites: None
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