SOCI-144 Race and Ethnic Relations
Spring for 2017-2018
Faculty:
This course offers an introduction to classic and contemporary research on racial and ethnic relations in the United States within the sociological tradition, which emphasizes the social constructionist perspective of race and ethnicity and the structures that maintain racial and ethnic patterns of inequality and power. It also examines the central tensions underlying race and ethnic relations. While the course’s focus is on the United States, we will devote some attention to intergroup relations beyond this country’s borders as a means of illuminating the definitions of and the roles that race and ethnicity play in shaping America’s identity and social fabric. As a requirement of this course, students will partake in A Different Dialogue as its lab component. This intergroup dialogue lab will allow students to extend their understanding of the course materials and draw connections to social identities such as their own race, ethnicity, nationality, sexuality and social class.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

SOCI-144-01 Race and Ethnic Relations
Spring for 2017-2018
Faculty:
This course offers an introduction to classic and contemporary research on racial and ethnic relations in the United States within the sociological tradition, which emphasizes the social constructionist perspective of race and ethnicity and the structures that maintain racial and ethnic patterns of inequality and power. It also examines the central tensions underlying race and ethnic relations. While the course’s focus is on intergroup relations in the United States, we will devote some attention to intergroup relations beyond this country’s borders as a means of illuminating the definitions of and the roles that race and ethnicity play in shaping America’s identity and social fabric.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
SOCI-144-02 Race and Ethnic Relations
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
In this course we will explore several themes, although the overriding theme will be the transformed nature of racism in the United States and how it creates, reinforces, and perpetuates racial inequality. After discussing the socially constructed and problematic nature of racial categorization, we will focus on how race and racism is learned. We will trace how racial difference is created and eventually generates socially segregated patterns by adolescence, which in turn become solidified in adulthood. We will then explore, in detail, racism and privilege
as systemic, institutionalized features of U.S. society. In particular, we will examine how modern racism has been coded and masked itself in seemingly race-neutral, color-blind language and practices. In doing so, we will translate the subtle racial meanings of this code. We will then look at how this color-blind racism, coupled with structural obstacles in arenas such as housing, the education system, the economy and job market, and the criminal justice system, help to maintain racial inequality.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
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