STIA-353 Energy and Sustainability
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Course Goals & Description

Energy has emerged as one of the most important issues our society will face in the 21st century, as it is increasingly clear that our current patterns of energy use are not sustainable. In this course we will examine available and future energy technologies in the context of their environmental impact as well as their technical, economic and political viability. We will also explore the technology and policy options that can lead to a paradigm shift from fossil to renewable energy sources. Each week we will examine different energy technologies, beginning with traditional fossil fuel-based technologies, then focusing primarily on emerging technologies including hydropower, wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, oceanic, fuel cell (hydrogen), nuclear, and others. We will also look at options for improving energy efficiency across technologies and across sectors. This course is designed to provide you with the methods, tools and perspectives to understand, critique, and ultimately influence the management of technical, economic, and policy choices regarding the options for energy generation and use.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

STIA-353-01 Energy and Sustainability
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Course Goals & Description

Energy has emerged as one of the most important issues our society will face in the 21st century, as it is increasingly clear that our current patterns of energy use are not sustainable. In this course we will examine available and future energy technologies in the context of their environmental impact as well as their technical, economic and political viability. We will also explore the technology and policy options that can lead to a paradigm shift from fossil to renewable energy sources. Each week we will examine different energy technologies, beginning with traditional fossil fuel-based technologies, then focusing primarily on emerging technologies including hydropower, wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, oceanic, fuel cell (hydrogen), nuclear, and others. We will also look at options for improving energy efficiency across technologies and across sectors. This course is designed to provide you with the methods, tools and perspectives to understand, critique, and ultimately influence the management of technical, economic, and policy choices regarding the options for energy generation and use.

Credits: 4
Prerequisites: None
More information
Look for this course in the schedule of classes.

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