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CCTP-699 Implications of Ubiquitous Network Devices
Spring for 2014-2015
Patrick McQuown
This course is intended to expose students to issues regarding the social, economic and ethical implications of networked devices on society, both now and in the future. Various industries have become increasingly aware of the impacts with the amplified use of computer technology on daily life. While technology promises many advantages to our society and economy, the full range of their ramifications must be considered. Network devices serve not only as a channel for information, but also as a conduit to disseminate information. Therefore, they can and have benefited not only corporations, but also the individual.

This course will introduce students to the major issues surrounding omnipresent access to information within our society, and to aid students in understanding the development, application, and consequences of network devices as social and technical processes. Topics to be explored include personal privacy and freedom of information, the manageability, risks and accountability of complex systems, and the goals and issues of corporations while considering professional ethics and professional responsibility.

Discussions, readings, presentations and a course project are components of this course.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

CCTP-699-01 Implications of Ubiquitous Network Devices
Spring for 2014-2015
Patrick McQuown
This course is intended to expose students to issues regarding the social, economic and ethical implications of networked devices on society, both now and in the future. Various industries have become increasingly aware of the impacts with the amplified use of computer technology on daily life. While technology promises many advantages to our society and economy, the full range of their ramifications must be considered. Network devices serve not only as a channel for information, but also as a conduit to disseminate information. Therefore, they can and have benefited not only corporations, but also the individual.

This course will introduce students to the major issues surrounding omnipresent access to information within our society, and to aid students in understanding the development, application, and consequences of network devices as social and technical processes. Topics to be explored include personal privacy and freedom of information, the manageability, risks and accountability of complex systems, and the goals and issues of corporations while considering professional ethics and professional responsibility.

Discussions, readings, presentations and a course project are components of this course.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
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