ARTH-426 Seminar: Durer
Spring for 2017-2018
Faculty:
The seminar will be an intensive introduction to the art of Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528) and to some of the staggering range of interpretive effort it has attracted. Dürer's work as a painter, printmaker, publisher, and theorist established him as one of the most influential artists of the western tradition. His impact was immediate and widespread, and has taken many shapes since the sixteenth century.

One of the appeals of Dürer for modern observers is the breadth and depth of his engagement with any number of historical and intellectual spheres. We will, for example, consider his work with regard to religion (changing devotional currents, the fledgling Reformation, etc.); local culture (German identity, gender relations, witchcraft, humanism, etc.); international travel and 'publicity' (mainly in Italy and the Netherlands); radical reformulation of the very idea of the artist as a unique individual (via self portraiture and the distribution of monogrammed prints, etc.); and other dimensions.

The seminar does not require students' previous study of Dürer, but some coursework in Renaissance and later art history, or in related fields, will be a significant help.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Art History Senior Major, Minor, others by permission

Sections:

ARTH-426-01 Seminar: Durer
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
The seminar is an introduction to the art of Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528) and some of the vast range of interpretation it has attracted. One of the many appeals of Dürer for modern observers is the depth of his engagement with a wide array of historical and intellectual spheres. We will, for example, consider his images with regard to religion (new devotional currents, the fledgling Reformation, iconoclasm); local culture (German identity, gender relations, witchcraft, humanism); international travel and 'publicity' (mainly in Italy and the Netherlands); and radical reformulation of the very idea of the artist as a unique individual (via self portraiture and the distribution of monogrammed prints). Our main focus will be on the works themselves and will include time spent with prints, drawings, and paintings in the National Gallery of Art. While basic familiarity with Renaissance art (e.g. through a survey such as ARTH 102-Renaissance to Modern Art) is recommended, no advanced knowledge of Dürer or Northern Renaissance art more generally will be required or assumed.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Art History Major, Minor, others by permission
More information
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