CCTP-636 Creative Industries: Reinvention Amidst Disruption
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Technology and the content industries have a long and complicated history, one of mutual dependence and outright antagonism. For every lucrative format shift there have been protracted wars of attrition between disrupters and incumbent industry. Today’s creative workers are caught between large-scale Internet services with alien business models and multinational media companies that commoditize creative expression at a global scale. Consumers, for now, are the beneficiaries of the digital age, with unprecedented access to content and the ability to “remix” and disseminate across territories with few meaningful restrictions. Cheap-to-free software like Garageband and iMovie, along with distribution portals such as YouTube and SoundCloud are redefining who gets to participate in the cultural conversation, often with little deference to historic laws and market conventions. Emerging generations are born to code and create media at such an incredible volume and pace. What’s the future for media access and discovery in an era of seemingly infinite access? How the global policy regime handle an influx of new creators, and what business models will persevere in a brave new world of micropayments and Big Data? Who gets to put a price point on cultural production the 21st century and beyond?
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

CCTP-636-01 Creative Industries: Reinvention Amidst Disruption
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:

Technology and the “content industry” have a long and complicated history, one of mutual dependence and outright antagonism. For every lucrative format shift there have been wars of attrition between tech innovators and entertainment companies eager to preserve historically profitable business models. Today, consumers have unprecedented control over access and dissemination, with endless reconfigurations and remixes obliterating the lines between legal permissibility and unfettered expression. Cheap-to-free software like Garageband and iMovie, along with distribution portals such as YouTube and Soundcloud (and countless open source innovations), are redefining who gets to participate in the cultural dialog, often with little deference to tradition. Coders are now creators; users no longer passive consumers of content, but rather shapers of shared experience. What’s the future for media access and discovery in an era of seemingly infinite access? How will the current copyright regime handle an influx of new creators, and what business models can support this brave new world of always-on connectivity and media saturation? How might practitioners navigate a shifting landscape for creativity and commerce while pushing forward with new innovations and modes of expression? Who gets to put a price point on access to culture in the 21st century and beyond?

This class will explore the tensions between technology, creativity and commerce, with practical instruction on remix culture, copyright and historic and emerging norms around creative expression. The course will also include guest speakers from various corners of the creative industries, public policy and the innovation space. The class will be conducted in seminar format, and grading and evaluation will be based on student seminar reports, weekly reviews of reading material, and a final project/paper related to the issue sets explored throughout the semester.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
Look for this course in the schedule of classes.

The academic department web site for this program may provide other details about this course.