INAF-100 SFS Proseminar
Fall for 2017-2018
STAFF
Every first year student in the SFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are:

• To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues
• To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS
• To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors
• To explore new ideas

Course descriptions for these courses are available at: http://www3.georgetown.edu/sfs/bsfs/new_student_registration/proseminars.html


Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Course syllabi
The following syllabi may help you learn more about this course (login required):
Fall '17: Langenbacher, E (file download)
Additional syllabi may be available in prior academic years.

Sections:

INAF-100-70 ProSeminar:
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are:

• To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues
• To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS
• To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors
• To explore new ideas
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
INAF-100-71 ProSeminar: Contemporary Middle East
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Every first year student in the SFS will take a proseminar during the fall semester. Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are:
· To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues
· To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS
· To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors
· To explore new ideas

This SFS proseminar will expose you a number of different subfields of scholarship on contemporary Middle East. This interdisciplinary approach will give you a multi-dimensional and critical perspective on cultural and social phenomena in the contemporary Middle East. We will consider a wide range of discourses and practices that have shaped the region in the last decades to pursue in-depth analysis of the following key questions: How do we define the new, globalized Middle East? What are the prospects of cosmopolitanism from past to the present? How does globalization and modernity impact local identities and cultures? What are the emergent spaces in art, culture and architecture, and how are they related to cultural heritage engineering? What forms of cultural activism have new social movements given rise to? How do Middle East diasporas represent questions of migration in contexts where they face prejudice, discrimination and misunderstanding?

COURSE OBJECTIVES
By taking this course, you will:
• Gain an understanding of contemporary cultural trends in the Middle East,
• Characterize current research and theory drawn from inter-disciplinary sources in Middle Eastern and cultural studies,
• Acquire the critical tools to assess the role of media and culture in Middle Eastern politics and societies,
• Gain critical insight into how modern Middle East literature and film mediates cultural, political and social issues.

WRITING OBJECTIVES
This seminar will help you:
• Use writing as a tool for inquiry to discover and integrate new ideas
• Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences
• Practice writing as a multifaceted, iterative process that involves planning and creating a draft, considering feedback from readers, and revision
• Deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency
• Adapt your writing in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations
• Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
INAF-100-72 Proseminar: The Story of Humankind
Fall for 2017-2018
Freshman Proseminar (INAF-100-72)
Professor Reardon-Anderson

The Story of Humankind

This course covers the story of humankind from prehistory to the future. The course meets twice each week. Students will read 50-100 pages before each class, at which we will discuss the readings for that week, focusing on the fundamental questions of the nature of human beings, their modes of production and social and political organization and concluding with a look into the future and how human beings may or may not create their own successor beings. Students will write and discuss three five-page papers and take a final oral examination
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
INAF-100-73 Proseminar
Fall for 2017-2018
Proseminars are small interdisciplinary courses, limited to 15 students in each topic and are taught by some of Georgetown’s finest professors. The goals of the proseminars are:

• To develop critical approaches to the study of global issues
• To gain the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in SFS
• To promote intensive interaction and camaraderie among students and professors
• To explore new ideas
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
INAF-100-74 Proseminar: Genocide in the Modern World
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
The overarching objective is to familiarise students with a multidisciplinary approach to genocide by drawing on history, political science, sociology and psychology to make sense of what is often described as the worst of all crimes. The course tries to impart both in-depth knowledge of actual historical events –focused on the Holocaust, Armenia, Cambodia, Rwanda, Sudan and the violence against indigenous populations in North America- as well as to map out attempts at theoretically grappling with mass extermination throughout the modern era: what role for ideology? Are genocides carried out by small groups of extremists or by “ordinary men who give up trying”, in the words of Edmund Burke? Is genocide an age-old phenomenon, or is it a product of modernity that occurs when nation-states are built and begin to democratise? The course situates genocide not merely within fractured states, but discusses how genocidal states –and successor states- engage with the international system.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
Look for this course in the schedule of classes.

The academic department web site for this program may provide other details about this course.