INTH-220 Population, Demography and Development
Spring for 2016-2017
Alaka Basu
Population is a lens through which to view the complex world in which we live. To follow current events and to be able to plan for the future, the changing size, age structure, growth and distribution of a country’s population is critical information – as is the overall global picture. This course will give students an awareness of the different demographics of developed and developing countries, with an emphasis on learning from comparisons and specific discussions of Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and North America.

The course will establish the core demographic measurements of fertility, mortality, migration, and net population change. It will consider demographic history, the slow growth of population before the Industrial Revolution when life was ‘nasty, brutish, and short.’ It will consider Malthusian and neo-Malthusian propositions and new views of how we reached 6.6 billion people at very different regional rates of growth. Know the past to avoid repeating its errors and to guide our future.

The impact of AIDS, migration, and the current demographics, and their implications for health care, education, employment and economic development will be key topics. Readings will provide critical commentary.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

INTH-220-01 Population, Demography and Development
Spring for 2016-2017
Population is a lens through which to view the complex world in which we live. To follow current events and to be able to plan for the future, the changing size, age structure, growth and distribution of a country’s population is critical information – as is the overall global picture. This course will give students an awareness of the different demographics of developed and developing countries, with an emphasis on learning from comparisons and specific discussions of Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and North America.

The course will establish the core demographic measurements of fertility, mortality, migration, and net population change. It will consider demographic history, the slow growth of population before the Industrial Revolution when life was ‘nasty, brutish, and short.’ It will consider Malthusian and neo-Malthusian propositions and new views of how we reached 6.6 billion people at very different regional rates of growth. Know the past to avoid repeating its errors and to guide our future.

The impact of AIDS, migration, and the current demographics, and their implications for health care, education, employment and economic development will be key topics. Readings will provide critical commentary.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
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