PSYC-362 Children and Technology (Children's Development)
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
PLEASE NOTE THAT DR. CALVERT WILL BE OFFERING PSYC 361 "CHILDREN AND TECHNOLOGY" SEMINAR IN THE SPRING. DUE TO A TEMPORARY ERROR, THIS COURSE APPEARS AS 362 ON THE REGISTRAR'S SITE. THIS ERROR WILL BE CORRECTED SHORTLY. IN THE MEANWHILE, HERE IS THE CORRECT DESCRIPTION OF THE COURSE OFFERED IN THE SPRING 2016:

Children and adolescents now grow and develop in a rapidly changing digital world from the earliest days of their lives. Our children now grow up digital natives. Yet the developmental needs of children, such as attachments and friendships with others, identity construction, the formation of romantic relationships, and differentiating fantasy from reality, remain a constant in their lives. How does the rapidly
changing digital experience map on to the developmental needs of children? In this seminar, we will explore how established and emerging technologies influence children's developmental outcomes. The technologies explored include television, computers, videogames, tablets, and mobile phones, as well as the content and games that children and youth use on these platforms. Social policy issues will be considered such as influences and regulatory polices about aggression, pornography, and educational media. Prerequisite: PSYCH 001.

BELOW IS THE DESCRIPTION OF THE SEMINAR OFFERED IN THE FALL 2015

How does a child grow and develop into the person that he or she becomes by the end of the adolescent years? How do biological and environmental influences interact to produce social, cognitive, and physical outcomes? For instance, why does one child grow up to be aggressive while another becomes prosocial? How does sexual orientation develop? Why do young children believe in magical beings, and why does that belief change as they grow older? How do children learn new behaviors at different points in their lives? What do dreams mean? Ultimately, how does a child move from one point in development to a later one? These kinds of questions are the focus of this course, which uses various developmental theories, including psychoanalytic theory, social cognitive theory, cognitive theories, and ethology to describe, predict, and explain social, cognitive, and physical development. Be prepared to reflect on and share experiences from your own childhood to answer these questions! This course meets a seminar requirement in the Department of Psychology and is also a part of the Education, Inquiry, and Justice minor. Prerequisite: PSYCH 001.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: PSYC-001
More information
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