PSYC-512 Seminar: Cognitive Neuroscience
Spring for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Cognitive neuroscience is borne out of the marriage of psychology and neuroscience. Advances in functional brain imaging technologies have made possible the characterization of healthy mind/brain relationships in vivo. These relationships have been further elucidated by fractionation of cognition due to brain damage and psychiatric disease. This complementary approach is revealing how the brain produces the mind at an unprecedented pace.

The objective of this graduate seminar is to journey through the field via seminal and contemporary articles that embody its interdisciplinary nature. The course is organized around functional domains and we will piece together their biology by examination of processes that mediate the functional experience and clinical conditions, psychiatric and degenerative or acute lesions, that perturb it.

Readings will comprise review articles, seminal research papers, and opinion/perspective articles. My hope is that you will leave the course with at least a few insights into the organization of mental function in the brain and some outstanding questions, to ponder in your armchair or laboratory. Permission of instructor required for those who are not enrolled in the Psychology or IPN graduate programs.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: permission of instructor

Sections:

PSYC-512-01 Graduate Seminar in Cognitive Neuroscience
Spring for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Spring 2006: Cognitive neuroscience is borne out of the marriage of psychology and neuroscience. Advances in functional brain imaging technologies have made possible the characterization of healthy mind/brain relationships in vivo. These relationships have been further elucidated by fractionation of cognition due to brain damage and psychiatric disease. This complementary approach is revealing how the brain produces the mind at an unprecedented pace.

The objective of this graduate seminar is to journey through the field via seminal and contemporary articles that embody its interdisciplinary nature. The course is organized around functional domains and we will piece together their biology by examination of processes that mediate the functional experience and clinical conditions, psychiatric and degenerative or acute lesions, that perturb it.

Readings will comprise review articles, seminal research papers, and opinion/perspective articles. My hope is that you will leave the course with at least a few insights into the organization of mental function in the brain and some outstanding questions, to ponder in your armchair or laboratory.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: permission of instructor
More information
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