SEST-679 The American Way of Spying: Evolution and Practice of US Counterintelligence
Spring for 2017-2018
Kelton, M
Events over the past few years, to include such well publicized incidents as the Russian Illegals' case, high-profile cyber attacks on U.S. classified databases and unauthorized leaks of classified information by Trusted Insiders, have re-focused attention on the role of Counterintelligence (CI) in protecting against espionage and other activities directed against the U.S.

This course will give students a better understanding of this least well-known, but absolutely crucial, mission of the U.S Intelligence Community (IC). It will address the theoretical and operational underpinnings, tactical and strategic, of the CI discipline and its place within the broader panoply of American intelligence activities. The course will examine the history and evolution of CI in the U.S.; the functions and responsibilities of U.S. Government CI organizations, to include particularly the Central Intelligence Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation; and the impact of CI issues on national security policy. Historical and contemporary CI operations, with a particular emphasis on counterespionage cases, will be used to illuminate the challenges inherent in the conduct of defensive and offensive CI operations. The course will consider CI threats currently facing the U.S., as well as look to the future at emerging CI challenges emanating from state and non-state actors.

Also included in the course will be an examination of the laws and oversight governing U.S. CI programs and activities, to include consideration of the tensions inherent in balancing national security interests and the protection of civil liberties. Students will conclude the course with a good grasp of the role of CI in defending and furthering U.S. national interests, thereby better preparing them for careers in the intelligence and national security arenas.
Credits: 3.0
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

SEST-679-01 The American Way of Spying: Evolution and Practice of US Counterintelligence
Spring for 2017-2018
Kelton, M
Events over the past few years, to include such well publicized incidents as the Russian Illegals' case, high-profile cyber attacks on U.S. classified databases and unauthorized leaks of classified information by Trusted Insiders, have re-focused attention on the role of Counterintelligence (CI) in protecting against espionage and other activities directed against the U.S.

This course will give students a better understanding of this least well-known, but absolutely crucial, mission of the U.S Intelligence Community (IC). It will address the theoretical and operational underpinnings, tactical and strategic, of the CI discipline and its place within the broader panoply of American intelligence activities. The course will examine the history and evolution of CI in the U.S.; the functions and responsibilities of U.S. Government CI organizations, to include particularly the Central Intelligence Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation; and the impact of CI issues on national security policy. Historical and contemporary CI operations, with a particular emphasis on counterespionage cases, will be used to illuminate the challenges inherent in the conduct of defensive and offensive CI operations. The course will consider CI threats currently facing the U.S., as well as look to the future at emerging CI challenges emanating from state and non-state actors.

Also included in the course will be an examination of the laws and oversight governing U.S. CI programs and activities, to include consideration of the tensions inherent in balancing national security interests and the protection of civil liberties. Students will conclude the course with a good grasp of the role of CI in defending and furthering U.S. national interests, thereby better preparing them for careers in the intelligence and national security arenas.
Credits: 3.0
Prerequisites: None
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