SOCI-001 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
Spring for 2017-2018
Sections:

SOCI 001-01: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW 8:00am - 9:15am
Healy 104

SOCI 001-02: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sarah Stiles
MW 9:30am - 10:45am
Healy 104

Sociology is the study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations, and societies, and how people interact within these contexts. (American Sociological Association, 2005)

In this course students will learn the basics of sociology through a variety of readings and film clips and "do" sociology with regular data workshops where they will test theories and recognize the social construction we all experience. By the end of the semester, students will be able to understand and explain:

• Basic concepts, generalizations, theories, and methods used in the study of sociology;
• The sociological focus and the influence the study of sociology has on identifying, explaining, and solving (or causing) social policy issues; and
• How sociology is used in everyday life to explain the social behavior of people, and even predict what they will do.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

SOCI-001-03: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Becky Hsu
MW 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
Walsh 499

This course is an introduction to the field of sociology, the study of people in groups both small and large (or very large). How does being a flight attendant require the “selling” of one’s emotions? Rather than being a timeless institution of knowledge and technical expertise, how does the form and field of American medicine reflect historical and social power struggles? What kinds of organizational forms do urban gangs use? How does our environment change how likely we are to help someone else? These are some of the questions that we will explore as we look at a range of topics that engage sociologists today: social change, social networks, urban life, health and medicine, religion, emotions, sex and gender, the economy, and social inequality.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

SOCI-001-04: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Christine Schiwietz
TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm
Car Barn 202

SOCI-001-05: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY
Professor Christine Schiwietz
TR 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Car Barn 201

To communicate the importance and excitement of the study of the social world! This course is designed to introduce students to the field of sociology, the exploration of society and how it operates. Sociology broadens social insights, fosters critical thinking, trains students in methods of gathering and analyzing data, and helps students develop their writing skills. By thinking actively about the issues facing contemporary society, students will learn to examine life situations and the influence of society and groups on people’s lives and the basic processes that shape social life. The course will introduce sociological perspectives (how issues of everyday life and activities) relate to the way society is structured and introduce socialization, culture, social institutions, social stratification, race and ethnicity, gender, politics, education and social change.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Course syllabi
The following syllabi may help you learn more about this course (login required):
Fall '17: Wickham-Crowley T (file download)
Additional syllabi may be available in prior academic years.

Sections:

SOCI-001-01 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
In this course students learn how the discipline of sociology came about and how the major theories have evolved. Students will develop their “sociological imaginations,” by practicing making the familiar strange. Major topics include culture, race, gender, class, and socialization. Data workshops allow the students to take their new knowledge and “do” some sociology. There will be 2 quizzes and a cumulative final.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
SOCI-001-02 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
MW 11:00 – 12:15PM

This course introduces you to the discipline of sociology and a sociological perspective for understanding human behaviors and social structure. We will discuss a great variety of topics, such as social class, gender, race and ethnicity, culture, housing, family, and community. While topics are quite diverse, we will be consistent in applying a sociological perspective and attempt to understand how individual lives and social groups are shaped by social structures, cultural understandings and distributions of power. Rather than textbooks, this course will use three books as focal points of discussion (Outliers, Unequal Childhoods, and Evicted). In order to exercise our sociological imagination, the course assignments challenge the students to dissect the current events from sociological perspectives. 
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
SOCI-001-03 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
WF 8:00-9:15 AM

Course Objectives
This course addresses the following goals and questions:
1) Students will be guided to connect all the substantive topics studied in this class to their own lived experiences and observations.
2) We will put the wide range of substantive topics covered in in sociological contexts, in order to understand them more fully. For example, what does it mean to think sociologically about history in times of rapid social change?
3) How do we use sociological theories to move from describing social facts in societies to explaining them?
4) We consider many varied sources of data about contrasts and contradictions in societies, in order to deepen our understanding of social conflicts and social justice concerns.
5) What are the implications of sociological research findings for individual and collective actions re: different qualities of social experiences, social policy proposals, solving social problems, dealing with controversial social issues, etc.
6) How do major social influences affect people at different levels of sociological analysis: personal, family, community, social class, gender, racial/ethnic group, societal, and global?
7) Which particular sociological theories give us the most viable explanations of social issues?
8) How do different research methods affect our interpretations of social facts?
9) How do we benefit from learning about major social influence in and among societies?
10) How can we be agents of constructive social changes in societies?

Scope of Course
This Introduction to Sociology course examines basic sociological concepts, theories, and methodologies by focusing on the substantive topics of community and alienation. We look at how different kinds of social change, social structures, social institutions, and interaction affect opportunities, social conditions, and relationships in groups and in society at large.
Specific indicators of community and alienation are defined and applied in class discussion and research projects. Although most data are based on U.S. experiences, some comparative data from varied cultural and historical settings will also be used. Attention will be focused on how the living conditions of all members of society can be improved.
Hierarchical authority structures and rigid divisions of labor in communities may increase alienation, and alienation may create new communities. Strategies to intervene effectively in disadvantaged communities--in order to ameliorate problematic social conditions--will be discussed and designed.
Small group projects (see detailed description below) may include field work in Washington D.C. Local community organizations are possible sites or topics for research on particular aspects of community or alienation, as well as more traditional library projects. Life history data may also be used to show how individuals are integrated in or alienated from specific social groups and mainstream society.

Required Readings
Andersen, Margaret L. and Howard F. Taylor. 2015. Sociology: The Essentials (8th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Students also build their own bibliographies to inform their group projects. These include at least six well-read sociological monographs/books or sociological research articles per group.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
SOCI-001-04 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
MW 12:30 - 1:45 PM

This course introduces you to the discipline of sociology and a sociological perspective for understanding human behaviors and social structure. We will discuss a great variety of topics, such as social class, gender, race and ethnicity, culture, housing, family, and community. While topics are quite diverse, we will be consistent in applying a sociological perspective and attempt to understand how individual lives and social groups are shaped by social structures, cultural understandings and distributions of power. Rather than textbooks, this course will use three books as focal points of discussion (Outliers, Unequal Childhoods, and Evicted). In order to exercise our sociological imagination, the course assignments challenge the students to dissect the current events from sociological perspectives. 
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
SOCI-001-05 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
TR 11:00-12:15PM

The course seeks to be a general and broad-ranging introduction to the field of Sociology. We begin with the basics of the discipline itself, including the array of research methods we use in our studies and writings.  We next consider the “raw materials” of society, including the nature and numbers of humans who make up the social order.  A large portion of the term is then given over to the study of culture: the basic concepts of culture and of socialization; the culturally nurtured institutions of family and kinship, religion, economics, and politics; and then deviance and crime as violations of cultural standards. The final weeks of the course are dedicated to the study of social organization and social structure.  We begin with the micro level of face-to-face interactions and then move “upwards” to the analysis of entire societies.  Several weeks are focused on inequalities of social class, of power, and of race and gender.  We end the course considering patterns of social change (generally) and of global development (more specifically), and studies of social movements, or conscious attempts to induce sociopolitical changes.

A.   Required Readings:  
Ballantine, Roberts, and Korgen, Our Social World (Condensed Version), most recent edition.
Massey, Readings for Sociology, most recent edition
Goodwin & Jasper, eds., The Contexts Reader, most recent edition
Plus many readings and handouts posted to Blackboard.

B. The Work.  Three exams, each covering roughly one-third of the course, will contribute equally to your final grade.  Regardless of exam grades, I reserve the right to lower your final grade for excessive absences; see the Undergraduate Bulletin (online) for your attendance obligations.  I also reserve the right to adjust those final grades upward on the basis of strong class participation.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
SOCI-001-06 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
TR 12:30-1:45PM

In this course you will learn in numerous ways that sociology is the systematic study of human society and social life.  This course is designed to be an introduction to the development of sociology, and an examination of the range of concepts, principles, and methods that comprise modern sociology using a core text and academic journal articles.  We will examine important issues and institutions of contemporary society, including culture, socialization, gender, race and ethnicity, education, family, social organization, inequality, and social change.  By the semester’s end, it is anticipated that students will understand the sociological perspective and be able to discuss sociological issues using the language of the discipline.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
SOCI-001-07 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
This course will introduce students to the discipline of sociology, the scientific study of societies and human social behavior. The primary goals of this course are for students to develop a sociological imagination in which they think critically and analytically about society and their place within it from a sociological perspective, and for students to develop an understanding about micro and macro levels of society. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and theories of sociology and be able to apply them in their daily lives.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
SOCI-001-08 Introduction to Sociology
Fall for 2017-2018
Sociology is the systematic study of human social behavior.  Sociologists examine not only how social structures shape our daily interactions but also how society constructs social categories and social meanings.  The purpose of this course is to offer an overview of the major concepts, theories and methodologies of sociology, and enable students to think sociologically. Thinking sociologically enables us to make observations and offer insights about the social world that extend far beyond either common sense or explanations that rely on individual quirks and personalities; to develop an awareness of the connection between personal experience and the larger society. Throughout this course students will be introduced to “the sociological imagination” and be encouraged to develop this critical capacity to understand how the social world around you works.  By the end of the semester, students should be able to:
a. demonstrate knowledge of basic sociological concepts, social processes (e.g., socialization, deviance, social control, or stratification) and social institutions (e.g., the family, religion, or the state);
b. summarize several basic theoretical approaches used in sociology;
c. apply these concepts and theories to contemporary events or personal experience, i.e. develop a sociological imagination; and demonstrate a knowledge of cultural, class, religious, and other differences within and between societies, as well as scientifically-grounded ways to account for these differences.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
Look for this course in the schedule of classes.

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