SOCI-131 Population Dynamics
Fall for 2017-2018
Spring for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Spring 2016
TR 11:00AM - 12:15PM
WAL 391
Students enrolled in Population Dynamics will become familiar with prevailing levels of fertility, mortality, marriage, and migration in each of the world's major regions; they will also learn what processes of change resulted in current levels. In addition, the course introduces multiple issues in the complex relationship between population dynamics and economic development.

Fall 2015
TR 11:00 - 12:15pm
WAL 391

Students enrolled in Population Dynamics will become familiar with prevailing levels of fertility, mortality, marriage, and migration in each of the world's major regions; they will also learn what processes of change resulted in current levels. In addition, the course introduces multiple issues in the complex relationship between population dynamics and economic development.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

SOCI-131-01 Population Dynamics
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Students who successfully complete this course in Population Dynamics will be able to provide descriptions of how mortality, fertility, marriage, and migration levels vary between major world regions, plus how recent change varies internationally. One of my goals is to help students develop a “demographic imagination” (akin to C. Wright Mills’ “Sociological Imagination”) that will help them see how the demographic importance of an individual’s attributes (education, religion, age, etc.) is shaped by social context. This will enable students to provide theoretical explanations for demographic levels and trends.



Along the way, students will become familiar with some of the tools that demographers use. In particular, they will become able to look at a country’s population pyramid and tell a story about the country’s fertility history.

The course also explores the complex relationship between population dynamics and economic development. Students will become able to explain why the human race will continue to survive, even though fertility levels are falling (and are already well below replacement in the most economically advanced societies). They will also learn how this has become a central question in demography, when the focus used to be on the perils of population growth.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
Look for this course in the schedule of classes.

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