SOCI-132 Immigrants and New Societies
Offered academic year 2016-2017
R 6:30-9:00pm

This course will provide a sociological understanding of the processes by which non-nationals move into and settle in a new country. In particular, we will examine some of the major questions that guide sociological analysis of migration. Some of the questions that this course will address are as follows: Why do people migrate? Are they allowed to migrate? How do immigration policies influence flows of migration? To what extent do newcomers become part of the mainstream? What kind of networks do they create? What impact do they have on the host country? How do they relate to the native population? Do they engage in the public sphere as political subjects?

Immigration is a fascinating yet multi-faceted subject. Students will be introduced to various sociological approaches, as well as strategies for investigating questions around immigration. In addition, students will be exposed to contemporary issues of salient relevance from a public policy perspective. Some of the topics to be explored include social-cultural assimilation, political incorporation, and economic integration. The course will primarily focus on the U.S., although we will also examine examples from other countries.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

SOCI-132-01 Immigrants and New Societies
Fall for 2017-2018
R 6:30-9:00pm

As one of the principal catalysts of social change in contemporary societies, immigration constitutes a uniquely fertile area of sociological inquiry. This course will provide a sociological understanding of the processes by which non-nationals move into and settle in a new country. In particular, we will examine some of the major questions that guide sociological analysis of migration: Why do people migrate? Are they allowed to migrate? How do immigration policies influence flows of migration? To what extent do newcomers become part of the mainstream society? What kind of networks do they create? What impact do they have on the receiving country? How do they relate to the native population? Do they engage in the public sphere as political subjects? The course will primarily focus on the U.S., although we will also examine examples from other countries.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
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