SOCI-196 Comparative Law Enforcement
Spring for 2016-2017
Faculty:
MW 3:30 - 4:45 pm

The purpose of this course is to present and selected law enforcement systems nation-states and international police organizations develop and use to control crime and criminals within and across national borders. The course will use a global comparative approach to the law enforcement systems countries develop to counter crime and its impact. Many nation-states have standardized their laws, a globalization to some extent. Law enforcement systems still vary greatly. Some differences are due to the system of law they enforce, but most differences are cultural. Those differences cause problems in dealing with global crime issues. Students will learn about the different law enforcement systems to better appreciate possible outcomes in countering transnational crime. The course topics will include:

• Discussion of the types of legal systems: common law, civil law, religious law, customary law
• Present law enforcement systems from select countries including U.S., France, Saudi Arabia, and the United Nations
• Compare the different law enforcement systems
• Discuss trends for the future

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Course syllabi
The following syllabi may help you learn more about this course (login required):
Spring '17: Daddio W (file download)
Spring '17: Daddio W (file download)
Additional syllabi may be available in prior academic years.

Sections:

SOCI-196-01 Sociology of Terrorism
Fall for 2016-2017
Faculty:
MW 5:00 – 6:15PM

This course focuses on terrorism from a sociology perspective. Sociology of Terrorism takes a deviance and social control approach to the concept, theories, structure, and control of terrorism. A concept of many meanings and applications, the first section of the course will examine the social construct of the concept, terrorism, from several social and cultural perspectives. The second component of the course will examine theories of terrorism from the traditional functional/structural, conflict, and interaction theories. The first is the theoretical approach normally applied by governments, the second is the classic argument used by terrorist groups, while the third theory focuses on the protagonists and the victims. Part three will focus on the current state of terrorism, and part four on the current debate about controlling terrorism. The method is lecture participation, and discussion. The last section will present expected future trends in terrorism.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
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