STIA-355 Environment and Migration
Spring for 2017-2018
Mueller, Valerie
Human mobility within and across borders is on the rise with rapid globalization and infrastructural investments. National concerns over human security and resource allocation have prompted discussion over the drivers and consequences of emerging migration patterns related to environmental stressors. The objective of this course is to gain perspective on the environmental refugee debate and learn how governments, donors, and international agencies are currently tackling this problem. Students will be introduced to cross-disciplinary concepts of migration and environmental stressors (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, water scarcity, soil erosion) in order to understand and discuss recent scientific work. The class will investigate the challenges in documenting this phenomenon and its consequences on society. The course will conclude with a broader discussion related to how existing governments and humanitarian agencies are addressing the issue today, in policy and practice. Registered students are assumed to have a basic familiarity with multivariate regression analysis.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

STIA-355-01 GLOBAL HEALTH AND INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION
Spring for 2017-2018
GLOBAL HEALTH AND INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION

People are increasingly on the move for political, humanitarian, economic and environmental reasons. This population mobility has health implications for migrants and those they leave behind as well as for members of local communities hosting international migrants. It is vital for students of international relations, anthropology and global health to understand the dynamics of international migration and forced displacement in relation to the delivery of health and mental health services. This course will emphasize a variety of places and cultures to discuss strategic health planning; institutional responses to the trauma of forced migration; cultural, social and political roots of disease and illness; survivor and patient narratives of pain, loss, and trauma; and the ways that various public policies and interventions aimed at alleviating the adverse health effects of forced displacement can actually exacerbate them. The format of the course will include discussions, commentaries, and lectures. A twenty-five page research paper is an integral aspect of this course. Students will be expected to explore a relevant topic area related to the class, which should reflect their interests and career aspirations.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
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