WGST-140-01 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Fall for 2017-2018
Spring for 2017-2018
Faculty:
This course introduces students to the discipline of women’s and gender studies. We will explore the broadly and critically defined “genealogies” of women’s and gender studies, and investigate the key concepts, theoretical debates, ideologies, and historical significance of the discipline. Learning and borrowing from Sophocles to Virginia Woolf to Audre Lorde to Cynthia Enloe, we attempt to construct a theoretical framework that will be helpful and challenging to our intellectual and practical pursuit of a just world in which both women and men can celebrate themselves and each other. In this endeavor, special emphases will be given to the issues of heterosexism, violence, militarism, human rights, sexuality and body, disability, labor, domesticity, and political activism. The investigation of these issues will be put in the context of related, but distinct, intellectual interrogations of race, class, nationality, ethnicity, and sexual orientations in the disciplines of race theory, postcolonial studies, LGBTQ studies, disability studies, and cultural studies.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Sections:

WGST-140-02 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
tba
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WGST-140-03 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
tba
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WGST-140-04 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Fall for 2017-2018
This course is designed to offer students an overview of the field of Women’s and Gender Studies. Since this is an interdisciplinary field, the course will introduce students to the range of scholarship from various disciplines and epistemological perspectives. The primary goal of the course is to train you in the art of critical and analytical reading, thinking, writing, and speaking about gender, sexuality, feminism, and women’s position in society in the past, the present, and the future in a global context across race and class. we will use class discussion, lecture, film, reading, writing, popular culture, public speaking, and field experiences on and off campus to connect personal experiences to global issues that impact our understanding and study of women, gender, and sexuality. We will critically analyze themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social contexts, such as law, criminal justice, culture, education, work, medicine, and the family.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WGST-140-05 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Fall for 2017-2018
This course is designed to offer students an overview of the field of Women’s and Gender Studies. Since this is an interdisciplinary field, the course will introduce students to the range of scholarship from various disciplines and epistemological perspectives. The primary goal of the course is to train you in the art of critical and analytical reading, thinking, writing, and speaking about gender, sexuality, feminism, and women’s position in society in the past, the present, and the future in a global context across race and class. we will use class discussion, lecture, film, reading, writing, popular culture, public speaking, and field experiences on and off campus to connect personal experiences to global issues that impact our understanding and study of women, gender, and sexuality. We will critically analyze themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social contexts, such as law, criminal justice, culture, education, work, medicine, and the family.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WGST-140-06 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
What is gender and how does it shape our lives? In this course, we will examine how gender—together with the closely related concepts of sex, and sexuality—informs questions of personhood, power, access, rights, identity, relationships, and norms in diverse social contexts. We will explore the broadly and critically defined “genealogies” of women’s and gender studies, and investigate the key concepts, theoretical debates, ideologies, and historical significance of the discipline. Over the semester, we will tackle the social construction of identity categories and difference, questions of privilege and access, the meaning and history of the feminist movement, and practices of activism and social movements with reference to a variety of historical moments and geographical locations. Adopting an interdisciplinary perspective, we will contextualize our investigation of these issues with reference to overlapping categories, including race, class, nationality, ethnicity, and sexuality.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
More information
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