WRIT-015-01 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
The Modern and the End/s of Culture

This course examines the clash of cultures in European literature, painting, and theater from the 1870s to the 1930s. During this vibrant period the arts, influenced by Freud, Marx, and Nietzsche, produced a radical transformation of culture. They assailed the tradition of religion, Realism, morality, and sought to “revaluate all values” in order to reshape art and society. The result was a shift in our understanding of the world and ourselves that reflects the new human condition of uncertainty and contingency that still resonates to this very day. What were the dynamics of this process? How was tradition reconfigured? How did artistic concepts of beauty change? How did the concept of the free individual lead to subjectivism and fragmentation? What was the relationship among the various “-isms” (Impressionism, Symbolism, Futurism, Suprematism, Expressionism, Surrealism, etc.) What was the role of the avant-garde? Why the turn to abstract art and formal/ material aspects in the arts? What was the relationship of art to life (to philosophical, technological, social, and political changes)? These questions will be considered in a broad European setting with texts from several literatures.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None

Course syllabi
The following syllabi may help you learn more about this course (login required):
Fall '17: Morris, M (file download)
Additional syllabi may be available in prior academic years.

Sections:

WRIT-015-02 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Apocalypse and Revolutions

Catastrophic change or, worse yet, complete annihilation—what could be more terrifying? In “Apocalypse and Revolution,” we will read works by Fedor Dostoevsky, Andrei Bely, and Boris Pasternak in which the unthinkable becomes the real. Through close readings and intensive class discussion, we will uncover the strategies through which fiction wraps our greatest fears in words in order to either stoke or allay them. Students will respond to the assigned texts through regular writing assignments, which analyze their insights into each writer’s visions of societal conflict and crisis. Assignments will include traditional academic papers, journalistic reportage, and short historical analysis.

Course Goals -- Students will learn to:
• Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences

• Adapt their writing for multiple genres, styles, and technologies in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations

• Based on analysis of genre, context, purpose, and audience, deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences

Required Reading:
(1) Fedor Dostoevsky, Demons
(2) Andrei Bely, Petersburg
(3) Boris Pasternak, Doctor Zhivago

Means of Assessment:

• Class participation 10% (Attendance at all classes is expected. Failure to attend regularly will result in a lowered semester grade)

• Response to email questions on daily reading assignments 10%

• 500-word essay representing a brief newspaper article on the social scandal caused by Stavrogin’s exploits in town 10%

• 1,000-word academic essay analyzing the place of one of the primary characters’ ideology in the novel 20%

• 500-word essay representing a brief newspaper article on the events leading to Russia’s 1905 revolution 10%

• 500-word academic essay explaining the function of one short scene in Petersburg 10%

• 500-word essay analyzing the 1905 Russian Revolution, using Doctor Zhivago as your source material 10%

• 1,000-word academic essay on a topic of your choice using Doctor Zhivago 20% (due on date of final exam)

• The first 5 essays must be critiqued by your small group and revised before being handed in
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-03 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
In this section we will examine the idea of romantic passion that appeared in twelfth-century Europe and has reverberated through our Western culture ever since.
What is the difference, if any, between “love” and “passion”? What is the relationship between love and marriage? How is marriage, on the one hand, and romantic passion, on the other, related to
happiness and personal freedom? How are these issues treated in different epochs and different national cultures?
Are those treatments still relevant in our contemporary U. S. culture, and what can we learn from them about our own lives?
We will read and discuss three literary texts: the twelfth-century archetypal Romance of Tristan and Iseult and two Russian novels: Alexander Herzen’s Who Is to Blame? (1847) and Leo Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina (1877). We will also read, summarize, and respond to contemporary and past discussions on the topic of the course and critical analyses of the novels; will watch a film version of Anna Karenina, and will write book and film reviews.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-05 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
#TruthIsOurCause

Truth Matters. Writers (courageous!) Wanted. Resilience Rises. Writing Happens. This course explores the link between these declarations by posing a series of questions. How does OUR writing respond to an urgency for truth and a resistance to false perceptions? To what extent does the ACTION of writing expose the belief that truth matters? How is truth happening when writing matters? What conditions provoke writing to enact a value for truth? How does attention to matters of truth depend on a value for writing? Isn’t it intriguing to note that even in writing a course description, the play between words signifies the complexity of truth’s relation to those who seek and communicate it with integrity? Those seekers and communicators are us – the participants in this course which is intentionally set NOW - within fall 2017. As writers (readers and thinkers) in this course, we are going to resist the claim that now is defined as the post-truth age. As writers in this course, we defy with vigilance and vitality that ‘alternative facts’ be permitted to obstruct the human need and right to know. Instead, this course argues: I perceive, therefore I am. We will not normalize lying, nor will we normalize the invisibility of the majority in our pursuit of truth. Again, that majority would be us – those ready to joyfully embrace our individuality and diversity as the health of our larger community. Reading and thinking our way through an abundance of texts, including that of Washington DC itself, we will explore a variety of texts that expose the truth as a cause – including truths of people of color, immigrants, women, the disabled, and sexual and gender orientations. We will read the rhetoric of protest and the narrative of awakening in the chant and the sign, the headline, the petition, the visual (photograph and film – both documentary and fictional), the short story, the essay, the poem, the Broadway musical, the encyclopedic entry for the publics, and the novel. Course participants will try out writing short pieces in a variety of these genres themselves en route to electing a genre in which they wish to write a more expansive response to truth in a final project for the semester, focusing on a contemporary debate or conundrum whose truth has been driven underground by a skewed societal, cultural, or political power at work. Writers in this course will therefore come to appreciate the integrity of a writer’s choice of genre – that form which will eloquently enable/fit/promote their subject and purpose to connect effectively with a particular audience. Yes, writing matters when truth matters! Course texts will include some of the following: Fun Home (Alison Bechdel), The Underground Railroad (Colson Whitehead), Hamilton: The Revolution (Lin-Manuel Miranda), All the Light We Cannot See (Anthony Doerr), The Refugees (Viet Thanh Nguyen), selected poems from Claudia Rankin’s Citizen, Drown (Junot Diaz), Song of Solomon (Toni Morrison), James Baldwin (essays and short fiction), The Americans (tv series set in DC during the Cold War), Hard Revolution (George Pelecanos), and signs from 2017 protests. You will write with pen, camera, and keyboard; you will revise and polish every written performance until its language, development and purpose exposes the truth so that it matters.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-06 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
“Utopian Dreams and Dystopian Disappointments”

Our utopias are always already utopias lost. Through a set of questions that we will develop together through discussion and writing, we will try to figure out why this seems to be true. Our questions will then guide our reading of Plato’s Republic, Thomas More’s Utopia, Huxley’s Brave New World, and George Orwell’s 1984. (Which is the dystopia, or even the utopia, from which we have the most to fear?) Readings will also include two or three short non-fiction readings, notably two reviews of a current film—possibly Interstellar or Ex Machina—as well as Nick Bostrom’s “In Defense of Posthuman Dignity,” and David Cole’s article “Can the NSA be controlled?” We will also view and discuss a dystopian film—Gattaca is the most likely contender because it takes up the issue of genetic engineering. (Blade Runner is another possibility, given its focus on the perils of AI.) As a course about writing, research skills and critical thinking, “Utopian Ideals and Dystopian Disappointments” asks students to write in a variety of genres. Students thus write an analytical paper on Plato’s Republic, but also an epistolary defense of institutional practices in Utopia, a short review of a film or book with a dystopian focus, and a research paper on some utopian or dystopian topic—a contemporary intentional community such as ZEGG, for instance, or an architectural design with utopian aspirations, or perhaps the dystopian possibilities of the ever more comprehensive information being gathered about us by the NSA and Facebook. Students are also asked to complete a series of short preliminary assignments and participate in small, mostly in-class workshops that lead up to the research paper—the emphasis is very much on process. Some students may also choose to participate in an undergraduate conference the following spring. And finally, the course also has a website (“UtopianDreamsDystopian.”) to which students contribute as part of the course.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-07 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Poetics of Justice

This course focuses on developing academic writing, speaking, and research skills through studying justice in the law and culture context. How does reading or rereading law and literature classics like To Kill a Mockingbird, Billy Budd, and The Trial through the lenses provided by philosophers, neuroscientists, and post-modern critics make a difference to our understanding of justice? Many short writing assignments, three longer essays with revisions, a field trip to the Supreme Court (with a related writing assignment) and a final exam will be required. Some of the questions we will be asking include: Can justice be reduced to a universal formula based in human reason? What is the relationship between embodied human emotions and an abstraction like justice? Do babies have a sense of justice? How about animals? Should new discoveries in neuroscience change our approach to criminal justice? How about new understandings of race, gender, and class? How do individual justice, social justice and global justice approaches interact? And what do we make of trolleyology? Readings will be drawn from fiction, philosophy, jurisprudence, architectural theory, and contemporary criticism and theory.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-08 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
In this course, we will examine the formation of digital differences on the Internet. With the increasing use of all things digital, in what ways do we identify ourselves and others? How does our humanness -- as racial, gendered and national selves -- figure into our online interactions? Addressing these questions intelligently requires critical thinking and scholarly engagement, two skills we will focus on developing in this writing course. Throughout the semester, we will raise questions about how digital differences shape who we imagine ourselves and others to be. As part of our contact with a wide range of texts -- fiction, essay, and video -- we will read, discuss, and write about digital differences as they figure into our notions of self, culture, and society. The course materials will serve as topics of conversation for class discussions as well as the content for your writings. Through the different course assignments, you will have the opportunity to sharpen your writing and reading skills as you develop intelligent responses to the challenging questions raised by our course readings. These readings include (but are not limited to) those related to visual culture, automation and replication.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-09 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
In this course, we will:

? Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences.

? Adapt our writing for multiple genres, styles, and technologies in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations.

? Based on analysis of genre, context, purpose, and audience, deploy language’s manyresources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency.

? Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences.

In order to achieve these goals, we will study the urban centuries: the concentration of people in cities throughout the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty ­first century. Scholars, policymakers, and planners have already described the twenty ­first century as the urban century, and the promise or inevitability of the mega­city seems to offer something distinctly new and has been met with a mixture of foreboding and excitement. Similarly, in the past, individuals experienced dramatic changes in urban spaces and demographics as something radically new. For instance, in the nineteenth century, the populations of London and Paris increased by nearly 500% as people flocked to cities for new types of work. This mass migration became known as the urban revolution. Throughout these past and recent urban transformations, writers, artists, and philosophers have explored the meaning of the city experience and measured how cities have changed the texture of daily life and the structure of relationships.

Although this course is not designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the development of cities or urban planning policies, our writing projects will allow us to inquire about aspects of urban experience: What defines a city? How do we read cities? How do we access history in cities? What is the relationship between the imagination and cities? What is public space? What unique challenges and opportunities do cities present? Due to the complexity and diversity of cities, we will have many opportunities for critical reading and writing.

This class is project­ driven. During the first half of the semester, we will practice reading cities by evaluating maps, short films, first­hand accounts, and scholarly texts. You will complete two writing projects that ask you to curate objects related to an urban environment by writing a very short text on an early film of New York City and by creating an interactive geocaching tour of Washington, D.C.. In the second half of the semester, we will turn our attention to developing our own arguments about how others have interpreted and represented cities. You will pursue an individual project that investigates the relationship between a representation of a city (film, t.v.show, series of advertisements) and the “reality” of that city. The argument that you develop in your project will be remixed as a short video essay. Throughout the entire semester, we will develop research practices that are appropriate for the college­ level.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-10 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Academic writing may appear to mean different things to different people, still, it always rests on persuasion. We write to communicate -- to get readers to look more closely at or think more deeply about something that’s worth their attention. This section of Writing and Culture will work on developing interpretive skills and strategies for compelling writing by exploring, analyzing and writing about cultural representations of political power. Is politics “the art of the possible”? “The opiate of the masses”? Is “everything political”? We will discover the various ways essays, speeches, journalism, drama, film, and popular culture engage such questions. We will pay close attention to the persuasive strategies of various media representations of political power, and how they relate to and implicate their audiences from The Communist Manifesto to Citizen Four.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-11 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
In 2010, Arizona legislators banned ethnic studies programming along with a group of well-regarded histories, textbooks, novels, plays, and poetry collections, including “classics” such as William Shakespeare’s The Tempest and Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed. In 2013, the Tucson Unified School District voted to reintroduce seven of these banned books. The controversies in Arizona represent some recent episodes in a long history of censorship in U.S. public schools and libraries. Hundreds of challenges are made yearly to texts for containing sexually explicit material, violence, homosexuality, anti-family sentiment, offensive language and Satanic themes, amongst others. What is at stake in these arguments over appropriate reading materials for students? What identities for students are being deemed legitimate or illegitimate? What versions of the learning process are being endorsed by those who challenge these books and by those who champion them? We will consider these questions as we read and write about banned and challenged books. We will read texts from a variety of genres including young adult fiction, history and poetry. Assignments in this course will center on the writing process (prewriting, drafting, revising, responding, editing, and publication) in order to develop critical thinking skills that can be used in a variety of disciplines. Ultimately, banned and challenged books offer a way to think through our beliefs about the purposes of education in a democracy.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-12 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Digital Txt: Language and Computers

How have electronics reshaped our written language? This course focuses on the rhetorical and cultural effects of computers and related devices, examining how they open new possibilities for artistic expression, intellectual debate, political protest, and social exchange. Among other topics, we will discuss the politics of online anonymity; the casualness of Tweets and text messaging; online archives of literary and visual art; and the permanence and impermanence of electronic texts. We will address these contemporary issues in the context of histories and theories of earlier language technologies reaching back to the gramophone, the typewriter, and the printing press. In written work, students will explore how electronics enable and constrain their own uses of language; students will also have an opportunity to explore how new media make it possible to develop new kinds of arguments.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-13 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
Digital Txt: Language and Computers

How have electronics reshaped our written language? This course focuses on the rhetorical and cultural effects of computers and related devices, examining how they open new possibilities for artistic expression, intellectual debate, political protest, and social exchange. Among other topics, we will discuss the politics of online anonymity; the casualness of Tweets and text messaging; online archives of literary and visual art; and the permanence and impermanence of electronic texts. We will address these contemporary issues in the context of histories and theories of earlier language technologies reaching back to the gramophone, the typewriter, and the printing press. In written work, students will explore how electronics enable and constrain their own uses of language; students will also have an opportunity to explore how new media make it possible to develop new kinds of arguments.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-14 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-15 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-16 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-17 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-18 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-19 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-20 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-21 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Armour, Catherine
Writing, Collaboration and Media Coverage

In this course students can expect to improve their writing skills in a collaborative, studio-based environment. We will explore writing both as an individual act and as a collective enterprise and apply design problem-solving strategies as a means of inquiry. This particular semester we will explore a topical, newsworthy issue chosen at the outset of the semester and track and write in real time as we follow developments in the news media. By engaging writing, and particularly writing in the news media, as cultural expression we will inform our ideas about what is rigorous, skill-strengthening personal work, presented in a portfolio format at the end of the semester. Students will produce work that reflects their own voice, as well as create work collectively. We will examine form, context, and audience, with an emphasis on developing strong personal writing habits and critical thinking skills. Whether one is a news junkie or a dispassionate observer, our seminar group will value a questioning mindset, critique our own and our colleagues work in-session and online, benchmark and advance our individual writing skills, create an index of methods and tools for collaboration and define how these collaborative skills may be used in other contexts.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-22 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-23 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
“Discourses of Disability”

This course does two main things: it provides practice in and consideration of effective writing, and it examines the role that disability plays in our culture. We will explore a variety of texts about disability and by disabled writers, from poetry in American Sign Language (ASL), to a number of recent memoirs chronicling life with autism. We will read Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, and consider the role of mental disability in modernism. Our analysis of these works will be informed by close readings of foundational texts in disability studies and critical and gender theory that have played an important role in considerations of the social construction of the “normal” body. We will also examine some of the historical and legal foundations for the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) and other developments in the disability rights movement. Of particular interest in this course will be the experience and representation of a range of cognitive disabilities and the ways in which they enable us to think about other minds.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-24 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
“Monsters in Literature, Film, and Culture”

This course turns to the figure of the monster as a critical lens for reading the value systems and anxieties of modern culture. As social outcasts and as embodiments of endless interpretative possibility, monsters resist “normal” categories and encourage us to examine the relationship not only between self and other but also between conventional and unconventional reading practices. What makes monsters both terrifying and fascinating? How do monsters challenge what we often take for granted as “natural” and is this challenge destructive, productive, or both? How do monsters provoke important discussions about gender, race, class, and species? In order to tackle these questions we will read and view works by a range of writers and directors, including, but not limited to, Mary Shelley, H.G. Wells, Alex Garland, and Gore Verbinski. In this writing course students will learn the value of close reading, of recognizing and using sources for different rhetorical purposes, and of research writing as a recursive process.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-25 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
In this course, we will:

- Read critically, paying attention to the ways that texts reflect their contexts, purposes, and audiences.

- Adapt our writing for multiple genres, styles, and technologies in ways that reflect different rhetorical situations.

- Based on analysis of genre, context, purpose, and audience, deploy language’s manyresources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency.

- Research, evaluate, and synthesize evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments for different contexts, purposes, and audiences.

In order to achieve these goals, we will study the urban centuries: the concentration of people in cities throughout the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty ­first century. Scholars, policymakers, and planners have already described the twenty ­first century as the urban century, and the promise or inevitability of the mega­city seems to offer something distinctly new and has been met with a mixture of foreboding and excitement. Similarly, in the past, individuals experienced dramatic changes in urban spaces and demographics as something radically new. For instance, in the nineteenth century, the populations of London and Paris increased by nearly 500% as people flocked to cities for new types of work. This mass migration became known as the urban revolution. Throughout these past and recent urban transformations, writers, artists, and philosophers have explored the meaning of the city experience and measured how cities have changed the texture of daily life and the structure of relationships.

Although this course is not designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the development of cities or urban planning policies, our writing projects will allow us to inquire about aspects of urban experience: What defines a city? How do we read cities? How do we access history in cities? What is the relationship between the imagination and cities? What is public space? What unique challenges and opportunities do cities present? Due to the complexity and diversity of cities, we will have many opportunities for critical reading and writing.

This class is project­ driven. During the first half of the semester, we will practice reading cities by evaluating maps, short films, first­hand accounts, and scholarly texts. You will complete two writing projects that ask you to curate objects related to an urban environment by writing a very short text on an early film of New York City and by creating an interactive geocaching tour of Washington, D.C.. In the second half of the semester, we will turn our attention to developing our own arguments about how others have interpreted and represented cities. You will pursue an individual project that investigates the relationship between a representation of a city (film, t.v.show, series of advertisements) and the “reality” of that city. The argument that you develop in your project will be remixed as a short video essay. Throughout the entire semester, we will develop research practices that are appropriate for the college­ level.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-26 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-27 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
Faculty:
“The Rhetoric and Culture of Space”

The postmodern geographer Edward W. Soja argues that the way individuals think “about space has changed significantly in recent years.” He explains that people are moving away from ideas that emphasize “flat cartographic notions of space” and have begun to look at space as “an active force shaping human life.” This Writing and Culture Seminar will look at the relationship between individuals, space, and writing.

In a manner that is very similar to written texts, deliberately constructed spaces (like monuments, historical sites, tourist attractions, university campuses, city parks, etc.) make arguments and have specific rhetorical purposes. In addition to examining the writing process, this course will encourage students to think critically about the politics and culture of the spaces they inhabit. There are numerous reasons why the analysis of space is important; this course will ask the following questions about space and the writing process: (1) Does the construction of space act as a metaphor for the writing process? Are there similarities between how an architect builds and constructs a space and how a writer composes a document? What does a tourist navigating a historical site reveal about the way a reader interacts with a written document? (2) What does space reveal about privilege? In other words, is the ability to comfortably move between (and be accepted into) multiple social spaces a sign of privilege? How can an awareness of space help us better critique and understand how privilege functions in society? (3) And finally, can theories of spatial justice prompt us to think critically about the spaces we occupy? Are certain spaces more democratic and/or more hospitable to civic action and dialogue? What can constructed spaces tell us about social justice and injustice?

Students in this course will learn foundational skills in writing and multi-sided inquiry, and will write more effectively in their personal, professional (including academic), and public life. Through class instruction, assignments, discussion, reading, and activities, students will understand rhetoric and the rhetorical situations they inhabit; write correctly, clearly, and compellingly for different audiences in different situations; develop a reflexive, personal writing process that includes invention, arrangement, style, and revision; analyze thoroughly the persuasive power of various texts using a rhetorical vocabulary; respond critically and constructively to the writing of others; perform library and internet research competently; and understand how the principles of rhetoric can help them become ethical, wise, and public citizens. In addition to the text Writing about Writing: A College Reader, students will read pieces from theorists and writers, such as Kenneth Burke, Susan Sontag, Edward W. Soja, Dean MacCannell, and Henri Lefebvre.
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-28 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-29 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-30 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
WRIT-015-31 Writing and Culture
Fall for 2017-2018
TBD
An intensive seminar, enrolling no more than 15 students, focused on developing students’ ability to use writing as a tool for inquiry, to develop their writing through an iterative process, and to practice writing in different rhetorical situations. Students should take this course as early as possible and no later than the end of the sophomore year.

The Writing and Culture Seminar helps students develop their ability to:

• read critically in ways that are attentive to language, context, and form

• write in ways that are appropriate for different rhetorical situations, with awareness of genre, context, and technology

• deploy language’s many resources, including its figurative power as well as conventions of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and semantics, to shape and communicate meaning with clarity and fluency

• research, evaluate, and synthesize appropriate evidence in order to build and support effective analyses and arguments
Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None
Other academic years
There is information about this course number in other academic years:
More information
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The academic department web site for this program may provide other details about this course.